Saturday, January 17, 2015

Low-Carb Diet Plan Templates for Atkins Induction and OWL

Today, I'm going to give you a low-carb menu template that I use when doing Atkins. I have one for Atkins Induction and one for the Ongoing Weight Loss Phase (OWL). I find templates much easier to work with than a specific menu. They can be adapted to suit your tastes and lifestyle.

Large Turkey Roasting in the Oven
Using Menu Templates for Atkins Induction and OWL Makes Menu Planning Easy

A Low Carb Meals Template Makes Induction Easy


Creating a low-carb diet meal plan isn't difficult, even for Atkins Induction. I have always found it best to keep things simple for the first couple of weeks while adjusting to this new way of eating. That's why I've never gotten into the Induction recipes thing very much. I always turn to plain meats, eggs, cheese, vegetables and salad when I'm doing Induction.

Atkins Induction is an introductory phase of the diet designed to get you into the state of ketosis. It's a very-low carb diet, sometimes referred to as a ketogenic diet, that severely limits the carbohydrates you eat each day to 20 net carbs, or less. In 1972, Induction was a very strict, very-low carb diet that mostly consisted of meat, eggs, cheese, and salad. Little else. Over the years, the Induction plan evolved into including vegetables, and when the Atkins Nutritionals people took over the Atkins name, a lot of vegetables was added to the menu.

Induction is lower in carbs than other phases of the diet, and the foods allowed are quite restrictive compared to other meal plans for weight loss. For that reason, creating a menu template for your low-carb meals can make the process easier.

Keto Diet Meal Plan Template (Atkins 2002 Plan)


Zucchini, chilies, green onions, sweet peppers, and tomatoes
Using a Meal Template Makes Vegetable Planning Simple

Doing the Atkins Diet Induction Phase correctly is essential to get into ketosis, and using this Keto Diet meal plan template to create your own ketogenic diet menu can greatly cut down on the amount of work it takes to stay on plan. By using the following menu template, you won't have to stand in front of the refrigerator any more and wonder, "What's for dinner?" You'll already have a rough idea of how to create a great ketogenic meal.

Breakfast:

4 to 6 ounces of protein (meat, fish, poultry, eggs, cheese) or protein shake
1/2 cup vegetables (optional)
1-minute muffin made with flaxmeal or 1972 Revolution roll
coffee with heavy cream and sugar substitute, tea or broth

Lunch:

4 to 6 ounces of protein (meat, eggs, cheese) or protein shake
1 or 2 1972 Revolution rolls (if having a sandwich or burger)
2 cups salad or salad vegetables
2 tablespoons of salad dressing, mayonnaise, or butter
diet soda, coffee, tea, broth, sugar-free soft drink, or water

Dinner:

6 to 8 ounces of protein (meat, fish, poultry, eggs, cheese) or protein shake
1 cup vegetables (1/2 cup if vegetables were eaten at breakfast)
1 tablespoons of mayonnaise or butter
diet soda, coffee, tea, broth, sugar-free soft drink, or water

Snacks: meats, fish, poultry, eggs, cheese, vegetables or salad that you didn't eat for meals, pork rinds with a sour cream dip or salsa, pepperoni chips or cheese chips you make yourself, diet gelatin

Adjust the Template to Fit Your Tastes and Lifestyle


Keep in mind that this is just a template that fits the Atkins 2002 plan. I've tried to keep it simple, so you don't have to think about what to eat. It can be adjusted to fit your tastes and lifestyle. For example, if you have a microwave at work and can heat up meat and vegetables easily, you might want to switch the vegetables and salad around. You could also have a chef salad for lunch and a burger made with Revolution rolls for dinner.

Daily portions of salad and vegetables allowed on Induction are: 1 cup cooked vegetables and 2 cups salad. If you skip the vegetables, you can have 3 cups of salad. There is no limit to the amount of meat and eggs you eat, therefore the 1972 Revolution rolls are safe game, but cheese is limited to 4 ounces per day and heavy cream and sour cream come with a 2 to 3 tablespoon limit. Sugar substitute is limited to 2 or 3 packages. Flaxmeal is limited to a maximum of 1 muffin a day.

Example of How to Use the Template


Breakfast:

3 scrambled eggs with 2-ounces chopped ham and a sliced green onion
1 minute muffin with butter
Coffee with 1 tbsp heavy cream and sugar substitute

Snack: 2 ounces hard cheese

Lunch:

2 cups salad made with left-over grilled chicken, chopped eggs, tomatoes, cucumbers
2 tablespoons full-fat no-sugar salad dressing
diet soda

Snack: pork rinds with sour cream

Dinner:

8-ounce cheeseburger topped with bacon slices and mustard (no bun)
1 cup steamed broccoli with 1 tbsp butter
hot chicken broth with a scrambled egg drizzled into it, and chives

Snack: Diet gelatin with whipped cream

Low-Carb Meals Template for Phase 2 (Ongoing Weight Loss Phase: OWL)


Converting the above template to the first level of the Ongoing Weight Loss phase is a much easier template to follow than the one for Induction:

Breakfast:

4 to 6 ounces of protein (meat, fish, poultry, eggs, cheese) or protein shake
1/2 cup vegetables (optional)
1-minute muffin made with flaxmeal or 1972 Revolution roll
coffee with heavy cream and sugar substitute, tea or broth

Lunch and Dinner:

4 to 8 ounces of meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, or protein shake
1 cup vegetables or 2 cups of salad
2 tablespoons of salad dressing, mayonnaise, or butter
Revolution rolls, as needed
diet soda, coffee, tea, broth, sugar-free soft drink, or water

Snacks: meats, fish, poultry, eggs, cheese, vegetables or salad that you didn't eat for meals, pork rinds with a sour cream dip or salsa, pepperoni chips or cheese chips you make yourself, diet gelatin

Tray of Salame, Cheese, and Green Olives
Adjust the Menu Template as You Return Additional Carbs to Your Diet

As you slowly return carbs to your diet, just plug them into the template where they fit into your current lifestyle the best -- meals or snacks, it doesn't matter. For example, once you're up to 30 to 35 net carbs per day, you can have both a 2-cup salad and 1 cup vegetables for lunch and dinner. You can also have more than 4-ounces cheese if you aren't sensitive to dairy. That makes meal planning super easy and quick.

Adapting the template is simple too. I always enjoy sliced strawberries with whipped cream after dinner, rather than with lunch, so they are easy to slip into the template. If I want them chopped into some low-carb yogurt or cottage cheese for breakfast, I simply have diet gelatin, pork rinds with dip, or some other carb-free snack, such as leftover hot wings, that night instead.

Dr. Atkins Ideas for Low-Carb Meals


In the 2002 version of the Atkins Diet, Dr. Atkins offered a few suggestions for planning your low-carb menus. In his opinion, meal planning was easy due to his acceptable food lists.

Breakfast:

ham, cheese, and mushroom omelete
bacon and eggs
smoked salmon wrapped around cream cheese

Lunch:

cheeseburger without the bun
chicken Caesar salad
tuna salad or chicken salad
chef salad with chicken, ham, cheese, hard-boiled eggs sitting on greens with a creamy garlic dressing

Dinner:

shrimp cocktail with a mustard-mayonnaise sauce
Use favorite protein source: lamb chops, poached salmon, roast chicken, filet mignon, buttered lobster tails, seafood mixed grill -- whatever you fancy -- plus a salad.

Dessert:

assorted cheeses
diet gelatin with real whipped cream



Dr. Atkins' ideas are mostly richer and more expensive than I can afford, but hopefully you get the idea. Eating low carb takes a bit of creativity, imagination, and thought, but you aren't on your own. Many have walked this path before and are willing to share what they have learned along the way.

OKAY. YOUR TURN:

What are your favorite low-carb foods?

Thursday, January 15, 2015

Atkins 1972 Revolution Rolls -- My Way

In the 1970s, when I first ran across the Dr. Atkins' Diet Revolution book at the library, I didn't have enough courage to make the Diet Revolution Rolls. I couldn't understand how beating egg whites into meringue could take the place of bread. Although the egg yolks are folded into the beaten egg whites, it still didn't make sense.

Angel food cake and other sponge cakes are made in a similar way, but for cake, you have to add a little all-purpose flour or cake flour to the beaten egg whites to hold the cake together. The yolks are not used. The original 1972 Revolution Rolls didn't have anything added to them to hold them together, except for cottage cheese, and that's probably more about moisture retention from baking the rolls so long, than improving their texture.

However, I'm extremely glad that I didn't try them back then. I wouldn't have liked the recipe as originally written. Gluten-free baking is extremely temperamental and limiting myself to low-carb ingredients would have only make things worse.

Egg-Salad Sandwich Made with Atkins 1972 Revolution Rolls
Egg Salad Sandwich Made with Revolution Rolls
(photo credit: SG, flickr.com, license CC BY-ND 2.0 Generic)

My Experience With Making the Original Revolution Rolls


It wasn't until 2007 that I decided to give the Revolution Rolls a whirl. Although I still didn't know a thing about gluten-free baking, by then, a lot of low-carb bakers had tried them and had put their own spin on the original recipe. Ingredients that were not available when Dr. Atkins first published the recipe, such as whey protein powder, have gone a long way toward making these rolls palatable and useable. Plus, experimentation has really paid off.

The original recipe called for baking the rolls on a Pam-sprayed cookie sheet for a full hour. The first time I tried that, the rolls were very dark brown after only 40 minutes, and totally inedible. They were like Styrofoam. They crumbled when I tried to lift them out of the pan. Others at the Low Carb Friends forum had similar experiences and were baking the rolls for no more than 30 minutes, so I tried that next. That worked beautifully as far as coloring and getting them out of the pan was concerned, but they were eggy and a bit disgusting.

Frustrated, I popped the rolls into separate zip-lock baggies, so they wouldn't stick together, and put them into the refrigerator overnight. I wasn't sure what I was going to do with them, but I wanted to see what giving them time to sit might do. The low-carb chocolate cake that I used to make back then was always moister and had a better texture after it sat overnight, so I was hopeful that the rolls might at least be edible if I waited.

I didn't really have anything to lose. I could always throw them away the next day if it didn't work. But it did. By the next day, the rolls had turned into a type of sponge bread that were strong enough for sandwiches and burgers. The texture change and taste was amazing. However, I'm not going to try and tell you that they taste like wheat bread; they don't. But they didn't taste eggy after sitting overnight either. They are a sponge bread with just a hint of sweetness.

Improvements on the Original Recipe


In the 1970s, cottage cheese contained smaller curds than it does today and not so much creamy liquid. Manufacturers have stooped to using lots of liquid and larger curds, which means that small-curd cottage cheese isn't small-curd cottage cheese anymore. It's what large-curd cottage cheese used to be. I haven't had much luck using cottage cheese in the rolls. The curds don't melt into the batter like they used to, so the rolls come out with little wet spots. They work better when you use mayonnaise or cream cheese instead. I prefer the taste of the rolls when made with cream cheese, but mayonnaise works just fine.

In addition to switching to cream cheese, I also like to add a little bit of whey protein powder to improve the structure of the rolls. Some people use flaxmeal, and some use a high-gluten type of flour, but since I can't have gluten and I react to flaxmeal, I haven't ventured past the protein powder. The protein gives the rolls a more bready texture.

I tried to use a bit of xanthan gum in them once, but I didn't see any noticeable difference. Xanthan gum works similar to gluten by thickening the dough and creating air pockets to help gluten-free flours rise, but the egg whites are already doing that, so there's no reason to use the xanthan gum.

The cream of tartar is to help keep the egg whites stiff. Vinegar, lemon juice, and baking powder will do the same thing, but vinegar and lemon juice will add more liquid to the batter. Baking powder is a mixture of cream of tartar, baking soda, and cornstarch, so when using baking powder to replace the cream of tartar, you'll want to use more than double the amount. A rounded 1/2 teaspoon would be perfect.

Batch of Atkins 1972 Revolution Rolls Made My Way
Atkins 1972 Revolution Rolls Right Out of the Oven (Before They Fall)

1972 Revolution Rolls

Ingredients:

  • 3 eggs
  • 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar or rounded 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 3 tablespoons cream cheese, mayonnaise, or small-curd full-fat cottage cheese
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons Splenda or other sugar substitute equivalent
  • 2 tablespoons whey protein powder (optional)

Method:

Heat the oven to 300 degrees. Line a cookie sheet with non-stick foil and set aside. Carefully separate the egg yolks from the whites, placing the whites in the bowl of a stand mixer (or a large bowl) and the yolks in a small bowl. It's better to dump the whites into your stand mixer bowl after separating each egg. That way, if you accidentally get a bit of yolk in with the whites, you've only messed up one egg and not the whole batch. You cannot have any yolk in the whites or they won't whip correctly.

To the whites, add cream of tartar. Beat the whites until they are very stiff. If you don't have a stand mixer or food processor to make the job easier, an electric mixer will work just fine. When stiff enough, you'll be able to turn the bowl upside down and the beaten egg whites won't fall out.

Stiffly Beaten Egg Whites
Beat the Egg Whites Until Very Stiff
(photo credit: Amy Stephenson, flickr.com, license CC BY-SA 2.0 Generic)

Into the yolks, add the cream cheese and sugar substitute. Mix well. The cheese will still be a tiny bit lumpy, but that's okay. Very carefully add the yolk mixture to the beaten egg whites and gently fold the two together with a spatula, turning the egg whites over slowly, until the yolks are no longer runny. This should only take about 6 or 8 strokes. No more. The yellow color won't disappear completely. That's fine. You don't want to break down the egg whites, as the meringue is what gives this bread its volume and puff.

Plop the batter onto the prepared cookie sheet by large spoonfuls, making six piles, and then piling one spoonful of batter on top of another. Divide the batter out evenly. Bake for 30 minutes. Allow the rolls to cool on the cookie sheet until stiff enough to handle, then place the rolls inside a zip-lock bag and refrigerate them overnight.

Don't skip this step! The rolls have to be refrigerated to lose their eggy taste. They will change their texture and become more bread like after they sit overnight.

There's about 4 to 5 carbs in the whole batch of Revolution Rolls, depending on the amount of carbs in your protein powder. That comes to less than 1 gram per roll. They do flatten upon cooling, so most people use 2 buns turned upside down, like the egg salad sandwich above. The flat side faces out for your burgers and sandwiches.

Friday, January 9, 2015

7-Day Ketogenic Diet Menu for Atkins Induction

What an Atkins Induction Breakfast Looks Like
Atkins Induction Breakfast:
 Bacon and Eggs, Salad, and Salsa
I'm going to be honest here. I have never sat down and mapped out a complete ketogenic diet menu for Atkins Induction or even the Ongoing Weight Loss phase (OWL). When it comes to planning ketogenic meals, I've always just shot from the hip. At times, I did have to start with dinner and then travel backwards from there, to create a daily menu that fit into certain parameters, but that was back when I needed to lower my fat and reduce the number of calories in my low-carb meals.

For Atkins Induction, that isn't necessary. The goal of Induction isn't weight loss. The goal of Induction is getting into the state of ketosis, so you don't count fat grams, and you most certainly don't count calories. You never go hungry. If you're hungry, you eat until you're satisfied. In fact, in the 2002 version of the diet, Dr. Atkins clearly stated that you should never go more than 6 hours without eating something. He made it a rule.

What Atkins Induction Will Do For You


Atkins Induction lasts for 14 days. During that time, you don't climb on the scale. You eat from a certain list of allowable foods and wait to evaluate your body's response to low-carb meals until after the 14 days have passed. That circles back around to the reason why Dr. Atkins created Induction, and I'm going to state it as clearly as I can because most people who start a low-carb diet don't understand the purpose of Induction.

Atkins Induction is not a weight-loss diet. It isn't the Atkins Diet. It's a method of changing your body chemistry to make it more susceptible to fat burning.

That's what Atkins Induction is designed to do for you.

A typical metabolism predominantly burns glucose for fuel. Those who live the Atkins Nutritional Approach predominantly burn fats for fuel. A ketogenic diet will change your chemistry -- easily and effortlessly -- IF you follow the plan. But that isn't always easy to do. A low-carb diet is a radical change from the way most people are used to eating. Common diet menus contain a ton of carbs, so I thought that the following 7-day ketogenic diet examples might help.

7-Day Ketogenic Diet Menu


These are only "sample" menus, based on what I might eat if I were to do Atkins Induction again. If you don't like something, or have dietary restrictions that I don't have, feel free to substitute with something similar. For example, you might prefer to use ranch or blue cheese dressing on your salad, garnish it with chopped hard boiled eggs, bacon crumbles, and celery -- rather than using the tomatoes. If you don't enjoy broccoli, pick a low-carb vegetable that you do like.

Baked Chicken with Asparagus
If You Don't Like a Vegetable in the Menu, Choose One You Do

Day 1


Breakfast:

1-minute muffin, toasted
1 tablespoon butter

Lunch:

Baked chicken leg and thigh
1 cup cooked broccoli
1 tablespoon butter
diet soda

Dinner:

Large pork chop sauteed in butter
2 cups lettuce salad with tomatoes, cucumbers, and green onions
hot tea with lemon and sugar substitute

Snacks:

2 ounces hard cheese
hard-boiled eggs
leftover chicken from lunch


Day 2


If you followed my 3-day Induction diet in the previous post, you'll already be in ketosis and won't need as much food on day 2 and 3. Your hunger will have been greatly reduced by now. But if you're using these menus to kick-start your ketogenic diet plan, day 2 and 3 will be somewhat difficult because your body will have started to run out of glycogen.

When your carbohydrate storage runs low, the brain begins to scream for food. Sometimes, that's in the form of carbs (desserts and sweet snacks), and sometimes, it's just food period, so the following two days will reflect the need to eat more food. If you're already in ketosis, the only requirement is 1 cup of cooked vegetables and 2 cups of salad. The rest can be adjusted as needed.

Barbecued Pork Chops
On Days 2 and 3 of Atkins Induction, You Might Need to Eat More Food

Breakfast:

3 scrambled eggs
4 slices bacon
1-minute muffin, toasted
1 tablespoon butter
1 cup warm chicken broth

Lunch:

2-cup chef salad with ham, chicken, hard-boiled eggs, bacon crumbles, and 2-ounces cheese
2 to 3 tablespoons homemade Thousand Island dressing
10 to 20 olives
diet soda

Dinner:

1/2 pound cheeseburger on two 1972 Revolution rolls
mustard and sugar-free catsup
lettuce and tomato for the burger
assorted raw veggies with ranch-style dressing
1/2 small avocado made into guacamole and served with pork rinds

Snacks:

a can of tuna with 1/4 cup mayonnaise
deviled eggs
2 slices ham luncheon meat spread with 1 ounce cream cheese each and rolled up


Day 3


Breakfast:

ham and cheese omelet (2-ounces cheese) with the rest of the avocado
1-minute muffin, toasted
1 tablespoon butter
hot tea with lemon and sugar substitute

Lunch:

Easier Hot Wings with ranch or blue-cheese dressing
a few deviled eggs
1 cup coleslaw
10 to 20 olives
diet soda

Dinner:

8 ounces of steak
2 cups lettuce salad with tomatoes, cucumbers, bacon crumbles, and 2-ounces cheese
2 tablespoons homemade Thousand Island dressing
1 cup warm beef broth with a scrambled egg drizzled into it, and garnished with chives

Snacks:

pork rinds with 1/2 cup homemade salsa
can tuna with 1/4 cup mayonnaise
left over hot wings or baked chicken


Day 4


By now, you'll definitely be in ketosis -- no matter which diet you started with -- so the amount of food in the menus will reflect a drop in appetite. If you haven't entered into ketosis for some reason, or if your body is fighting against making the switch to predominantly burning fats, you can simply add a variety of foods to the rest of the menus that don't have carbs. Meat, fish, poultry, eggs, broth, and fats are basically free foods, especially during the first 14 days. 1-minute muffins are limited to one per day.

What I usually do on Atkins Induction is cook up a lot of protein foods -- a pork roast, turkey breast, or a 9x13 pan of chicken legs and thighs -- so there is plenty of meat on hand to snack on. I make sure that I have several cans of tuna in the cupboard. I hard boil at least a dozen eggs and buy a 3-lb brick of bacon ends before starting. That way, there are easy snacks available whenever I'm hungry.

Package of 3-pounds bacon ends
Keep Lots of Bacon on Hand for Ketogenic Meals and Snacks

Breakfast:

Chocolate Protein Shake

Lunch:

Ham and cheese sandwich made with two 1972 Revolution rolls
mayonnaise or mustard
lettuce and tomato for the sandwich, if desired
diet soda

Dinner:

6 ounces fish baked in foil packets with butter, herbs and spices
2-cup lettuce salad with tomatoes, cucumbers, and radishes
2 tablespoons homemade Thousand Island dressing
1 cup cooked broccoli and cauliflower, mixed
hot tea with lemon and sugar substitute

Snacks:

hard boiled eggs, deviled if you prefer them that way
warm chicken broth with scrambled egg drizzled into it, and chives
diet gelatin with whipped cream


Day 5


Breakfast:

1-minute muffin, toased
1 tablespoon butter

Lunch:

Chicken or tuna salad with bacon crumbles, green onions, chopped celery, and spices
served in two 1972 Revolution rolls
pork rinds with 1/2 cup homemade salsa
diet soda

Dinner:

6 ounces of sliced pork roast (cooked in the crock pot)
2-cup lettuce salad with tomatoes, cucumbers, green onions, radishes
2 tablespoons homemade Thousand Island dressing
hot tea with lemon and sugar substitute

Snacks:

cheese sticks
hard boiled eggs
diet gelatin with whipped cream


Tuna Salad with Tomatoes, Olives, Hard-Boiled Eggs
Main Dish Salads Keep Ketogenic Diet Menus Easy

Day 6


Breakfast:

Chocolate protein shake

Lunch:

2-cup chef salad with tuna, cheese, hard boiled eggs, bacon crumbles, and 1/2 small avocado
2 to 3 tablespoons homemade Thousand Island dressing
10 to 20 olives
diet soda

Dinner:

Meatballs made with crushed pork rinds and simmered in Alfredo sauce
served over 1 cup french-style green beans with mushrooms
deviled eggs

Snacks:

pork rinds with homemade cream-cheese dip (green onions, bacon, jalapeno)
left over slices of pork roast
chicken broth with scrambled egg drizzled into it, and chives


Day 7


Breakfast:

2 scrambled eggs
3 slices of bacon
1-minute muffin, toasted
1 tablespoon butter
hot tea with lemon and sugar substitute

Lunch:

baked chicken leg and thigh
1 cup cold vegetable salad made with cooked vegetables and sugar-free Italian dressing
diet soda

Dinner:

8 ounces fish spread with mayo and rolled in crushed pork rinds and Parmesan cheese, then baked
1 cup coleslaw
small raw vegetable tray with ranch-style dressing

Snacks:

chicken vegetable soup
cheese sticks
2 slices ham luncheon meat spread with 1 ounce cream cheese each, rolled up


Additional Menu Tips and Ideas


Bowl of Low-Carb Chicken Strips Made with Crushed Pork Rinds
Try Making Chicken Strips with
 Crushed Pork Rinds and Parmesan Cheese
My own meals would be far more repetitive than this varied ketogenic diet menu is. I would take advantage of leftovers and eat them for breakfast and snacks. Maybe even have the same main dish, such as the pork roast, for two days in a row. I've been known to eat baked chicken every day for a week, ground turkey patties, meatballs, and especially hot wings. I love them!

Chicken strips are another Induction favorite. To make them, you simply cut a chicken breast into strips, coat them in spices, dredge in a mixture of heavy cream and egg, and then coat them with crushed pork rinds and Parmesan cheese, similar to what I did with the fish in the above menus. The Heroin wings in our recipe archives here is also great for Induction.

Another easy dish is to take chicken breast, cut it into bite-sized cubes, saute it in a non-stick frying pan until browned on all sides. Then coat the cubes with a little bit of garlic-chili sauce, available in the oriental section of your local supermarket. Start with just a dab. The stuff is sugar free but hot, and you can easily get too much if you aren't used to eating spicy food.

Ham and Green Bean Soup
Ham and Green Bean Soup
 Makes a Great Atkins Induction Meal

A custard made with heavy cream and a couple of eggs also makes a nice breakfast when you're sick of eggs because you can't taste them in the custard. There's no reason why you have to eat eggs everyday, though. Like I said, I often eat leftovers for breakfast, some type of meat and vegetable soup, or even baked chicken. I love hot wings first thing in the morning. I used to make a lot of protein shakes for breakfast and snacks when I was working because the shakes are easy and quick to make. A lot of low-carb dieters also eat lots of taco salad.

How you design your ketogenic diet menus will depend on your lifestyle. Working from home will give you more freedom with your meals than if you need to take your lunch with you to work. A lot of times, the trick is simply to substitute high-carb ingredients for low-carb ones. For example, in the above menu, the meatballs are simmered in a low-carb Alfredo sauce (instead of a beef gravy) and can be served over the green beans, rather than noodles or rice.

If you choose to stay on Atkins Induction for more than 14 days, you'll want to find recipes that stay within the Induction rules and guidelines. The above ketogenic diet menus don't take a lot of advantage of fancy recipes. They are a more simplified approach to Atkins Induction for those who are new to a low-carb diet. However, a ketogenic diet can be as complex or simple as you like. The choice is up to you.

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